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Does distillation remove fluoride from water?

Does distillation remove fluoride from water? - Chemistry Forum

Does distillation remove fluoride from water? - Chemistry Forum. Discuss chemical reactions, chemistry.


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  #1  
Old 10-07-2003, 05:26 AM
SJ
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Default Does distillation remove fluoride from water?



Hi. I have been looking on the Internet to see whether distillation
(in particular, distillation units for the home) will remove fluoride
from fluoridated tap water. I'm also interested in whether
distillation will remove chlorine. I've seen conflicting information,
so I'm not sure what to believe. If distillation units would remove
these two ions, what would be the approximate removal percentage? Or
are there any Web sites that might tell me this? Thanks a lot for any
help.
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  #2  
Old 10-07-2003, 07:29 AM
Bernhard Kuemel
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Default Does distillation remove fluoride from water?

SJ wrote:

It will remove fluoride (F-) and chloride (Cl-) but not elemental
chlorine (Cl2). The latter may be reduced by open boiling or
chemical reduction.

Bernhard

--
Low end Serverhousing ab 25 e inkl. 1x 11 e/GB, etc.: [Only registered users see links. ]

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  #3  
Old 10-07-2003, 11:53 AM
SNUMBER6
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Default Does distillation remove fluoride from water?

>From: [Only registered users see links. ] (SJ)


Actually ... it removes the water from the fluoride ... Deionizers would remove
the fluoride fom he water ...


Not necessarily ... it would carry through ... a certain amount would escape
.... boiling water removes the chlorine from the water but carries it with the
steam ... which becomes distilled water ...

since we are only talking about ppm levels ... removal would be essentially
complete ...

Be seeing you
In the Village
Number 6

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  #4  
Old 10-07-2003, 07:12 PM
SJ
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Default Does distillation remove fluoride from water?

[Only registered users see links. ] (SNUMBER6) wrote in message news:<20031007075321.13226.00000261@mb-m24.aol.com>...

That's good enough.

Here's what confused me. The text below comes from the following
Web page: [Only registered users see links. ]. Is what this person
wrote just utter nonsense?

"Distillation units will also not work because similar sized polar
molecules have similar boiling and freezing points. Water boils at
212 degrees Fahrenheit and FH boils at 203 to 239 degress Fahrenheit.
So, when your distillation unit has warmed up the water to 212 degrees
Fahrenheit, and the water starts to boil off (evaporate), *so* does
the Fluoride! It stays right with the water vapor, and gets condensed
back into liquid at the end of the process. So, don't let anyone tell
you otherwise and don't trust those that do."

Thanks a lot for your help, Bernhard and SNUMBER6.
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  #5  
Old 10-07-2003, 09:06 PM
Marvin Margoshes
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Default Does distillation remove fluoride from water?


"SJ" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:1ef5cd76.0310071112.5255b859@posting.google.c om...
news:<[Only registered users see links. ].com>...

That statement is absolutely wrong. Molecular weight is only one factor in
determining the boiling point. The strength of attractions between
molecules is more important. Water's boiling point is much higher than most
molecules its size, or even larger, because water molecules are held
together by hudrogen bonds.

HF molecules are also held together by hydrogen bonds, but in water solution
few of the HF molecules are present as molecules; it is mostly ionized.
Those few HF molecules that are present are almost entirely hydrogen bonded
to the vastly more abundant water molecules.



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  #6  
Old 10-07-2003, 10:14 PM
Steve Turner
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Default Does distillation remove fluoride from water?

[Only registered users see links. ] (SJ) wrote:



Yes, it's nonsense. One of a large number of excellent examples of
why you can't believe everything you read, especially on the web...

Steve Turner

Real address contains worldnet instead of spamnet
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  #7  
Old 10-08-2003, 01:49 AM
somebody@compusmart.ab.ca
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Default Does distillation remove fluoride from water?

[Only registered users see links. ] (SJ) wrote:


Yes. The web site presents "fact" statements, many -not all-
undoubtedly correct, linked by leaps of logic to arrive at
non-sequiturs.

Roger

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  #8  
Old 10-08-2003, 08:22 AM
dave.lister@web.de
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Default Does distillation remove fluoride from water?

>

This "creative chemistry" has trouble with the periodic table too...
halogen is halide... and As is astatine he thinks... so much for him
being an "expert" in the area. He was probably drunk and forgot about
setting up this page in the morning. It is total BS that HF should be
more reactive than HCl. HCl is the much stronger acid. HF dissolves
glass, which might suggest that is devilish stuff, but that's the only
aspect where it does something that can't be done by other HX. The
acidity of HX follows exactly the opposite trend of the reactivity of
the halogens. This is something the author is totally oblivious to.

Furthemore i am not convinced that F- will be removed from the water
thru distillation, since HF is as opposed to other HX acid not a
strong acid. This means that some of HF will be present in the water
as well. HF/H2O "complexes" or "clusters" are well known because of
the tendencies of both materials to form strong H-bridges (hence the
high boiling points compared to the higher homologes H2S and HCl). So
distillation might very well shift the F- + H2O <-> HF + OH- or H3O+
+ F- <-> HF + H2O equilibrium to the right side due to the constant
removal of HF through the distillation process.

The ion exchanger as suggested further up in this thread seems the
best solution IF you want to remove the fluorine.
Just keep in mind that about every water purifying system integrated
in yer potable water installation is a possible time bomb since it
removes all the additives which make sure a biological contamination
(e.coli, legionella) cannot take place. The water staying in the pipes
behind the water purifier will be a playground for microorganisms.
Immediate "danger" will be avoided by letting the tap run a while
every morning. But it can happen that the colonies will stick to the
walls of yer tubing, in fittings etc. and stay there.

This problem is not too serious if you are healthy with a decent
immune system, just reconsider the need to remove Fluorine because of
one moron's amateur chemistry page with more errors that dubya's
economic strategies.
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  #9  
Old 10-08-2003, 09:56 AM
Lloyd Parker
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Default Does distillation remove fluoride from water?

In article <[Only registered users see links. ] >,
[Only registered users see links. ] (SJ) wrote:
news:<[Only registered users see links. ].com>...
But you don't have HF in water (not much of it, anyway), and its b.p. is
around 20 C, according to the Merck Index. Most fluoride is simply aqueous F-
ions. And ions don't have what you'd call boiling points in the same sense.
As the water boils off, the F- associates more and more with cations in the
remaining liquid water, and XF ionic compounds would have very high b.p.s.
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  #10  
Old 10-08-2003, 09:56 PM
SJ
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Default Does distillation remove fluoride from water?

Steve Turner <srturner1@spamnet.att.net> wrote in message news:<j7b6ov4vckhk5ki7u7j5oaehj5nun37ksd@4ax.com>. ..


So I see. Anyway, thank you, Steve and everyone else who
responded, for your help. Your discussions were very informative.
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