Special Feature

User Panel

My Panel

My Panel

Bookmark Science Articles

Recent News
Bookmark / Share This Science Site

A network-based analysis of polyanion-binding proteins utilizing human protein arrays.

A network-based analysis of polyanion-binding proteins utilizing human protein arrays. Research Abstract Details 

Research Abstract Table of Contents

Jump to the:

  • Abstract Text of This Paper
  • Journal Published
  • MeSH Keywords of This Abstract
  • Chemicals and Substances Used in this Paper
  • Grants and Granting Agency of this Research
  • Database Accession Numbers Used in this Paper
  • Related Papers
  • Related Research Tags
  • Rate this Research Paper
  • A network-based analysis of polyanion-binding proteins utilizing human protein arrays. Abstract Text:

    nazila salamat-millerNazila Salamat-Miller,jianwen fangJianwen Fang,christopher w seidelChristopher W Seidel,yassen assenovYassen Assenov,mario albrechtMario Albrecht,c russell middaughC Russell Middaugh,

    The existence of interactions between many cellular proteins and various polyanionic surfaces within a cell is now well established. The functional role of such interactions, however, remains to be clearly defined. The existence of protein arrays, with a large selection of different kinds of proteins, provides a way to better address a number of aspects of this question. We have therefore investigated the interaction between five cellular polyanions (actin, tubulin, heparin, heparan sulfate, and DNA) and approximately 5,000 human proteins using protein microarrays in an attempt to better understand the functional nature of such interaction(s). We demonstrate that a large number of polyanion-binding proteins exist that contain multiple positively charged regions, are often disordered, are involved in phosphorylation processes, and appear to play a role in protein-protein interaction networks. Considering the crowded nature of cellular interiors, we propose that polyanion-binding proteins interact with a wide variety of polyanionic surfaces in cells in a functionally significant manner.

    A network-based analysis of polyanion-binding proteins utilizing human protein arrays. Publishing Authors By Initials

    n salamat-millerN Salamat-Miller,j fangJ Fang,cw seidelCW Seidel,y assenovY Assenov,m albrechtM Albrecht,cr middaughCR Middaugh,

    For similar proteins research abstracts see: proteins research

    PUBMED ID PMID:

    MEDLINE DATE:

    A network-based analysis of polyanion-binding proteins utilizing human protein arrays. Journal Published:

    PUBLICATION TYPE: Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov

    Journal: The Journal of biological chemistry

    VOLUME: 282

    Page Numbers: 10153-63

    Journal Abbreviation: J. Biol. Chem.

    ISSN: 0021-9258

    DAY: 2

    MONTH: 02

    YEAR: 2007

    A network-based analysis of polyanion-binding proteins utilizing human protein arrays. Information

    Number of References:

    LANGUAGE: eng

    NlmUniqueID: 2985121

    A network-based analysis of polyanion-binding proteins utilizing human protein arrays. Keywords Mesh Terms:

    KEYWORDS: Proteins

    MESH TERMS: metabolism

    Chemical & Substance for Abstract: A network-based analysis of polyanion-binding proteins utilizing human protein arrays. Information

    Substance Name: polyanions

    Registry Number: 0

    Grant and Affiliation Information for A network-based analysis of polyanion-binding proteins utilizing human protein arrays.

    AFFILIATION: Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66047, USA.

    Country: United States

    United States Research PublicationUnited States Research Publication

    AGENCY: United States NCRR

    GRANT: P20 RR016475

    ACRONYM: RR

    MEDLINETA: J Biol Chem

    REFSOURCE:

    DATABASENAME:

    ACCESSION NUMBER:

    Number Hits: 0

    A network-based analysis of polyanion-binding proteins utilizing human protein arrays Related Publications

     

    Molecular Station USER Menu

    Welcome to Molecular Station!

    You have to register before you can post on our forums or use our advanced features. Register Now! Its Free and Fast!

    Already registered? Login now below.

    User Name:

    Password:

    Already registered and Forgot your password? Click below to recover it.

    Recover Lost Password

    Join now - it's fast and free!

    Molecular Station is THE largest network of researchers, scientists and science lovers anywhere!

    Research Terms of Usage and Disclaimer
    Home
    Features

    Protocols

    DNA Forum

    Science Forum

    DNA Forum
    Biology Forum

    Science News


    [CaRP] XML error: Invalid document end at line 2

    For more click here:Science News